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Kindness - how you can spread the magic for more love and happiness in life

The truth is that in the moment of being kind, something simply takes over and we are often compelled to keep going. My own experiences of being kind and receiving kindness is that it is beyond description, it has its own spirit and there are so many ways that we can tune into it at any given moment.

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Kindness is power postcard

The truth is that in the moment of being kind, something simply takes over and we are often compelled to keep going. My own experiences of being kind and receiving kindness is that it is beyond description, it has its own spirit and there are so many ways that we can tune into it at any given moment.

Kindness affects our brains in many positive ways, being kind boosts serotonin and dopamine, which are neurotransmitters in the brain that give you feelings of satisfaction and well-being, and this causes the pleasure/reward centres in your brain to light up.

Oxytocin, often described as ‘the love hormone’, is produced when we are experience kindness, there has even been a suggestion that it could also produce the brains own morphine.

Dr David Hamilton (I like to call him the kindness guru) reports “that we have kindness genes and that the main gene associated with kindness is the oldest in the human genome, at around 500 million years old, which have undoubtedly played a role in our survival as human beings and why we are drawn to help others”.

The brain changes happen as a result of how kindness feels to us and our focus and thoughts on kindness. If we consistently engage with being kind, then our brain strengthens the neural pathways, in the same way that if we work a muscle, it gets stronger and stronger.

Research shows that giving, receiving or witnessing kindness improves our mental and physical health
  • We find it easier to access happiness, dopamine is produced, which in turn elevates mood
  • It reduces the stress response, ‘buffering’ its effects on us and lowering the stress hormone cortisol
  • It slows the ageing process & reduces inflammation
    It produces endorphins which relieve pain, acting like a natural painkiller
  • It can boost energy levels, promote calm, increase feeling of self-worth as well as helping people to feel less depressed
  • Its good for our hearts, also reducing blood pressure
  • It’s pretty much contagious, it spreads, rippling out far and wide
  • It’s something that we can learn to be- so start building your kindness muscles today!
Choose kindness - Notice board with bunting, motivational note and happy figurines
What can you do to be or become kinder?

Start to use your kindness muscles, smile at yourself and those around you- it helps to make people feel good.

If you are a hugger- then give more hugs!

Know that you can make a difference, no matter how small, many small kindnesses all add up.

Put yourself in others shoes, also see your face in others, notice how that changes your perspective, what positive change can you make?

Assume the best & practice gratitude.

Value others’ opinions and ideas, even when you do not agree, listen without thinking of what your answer will be, this helps others to feel heard and valued and by focusing on what you do agree with, creates better communication and understanding.

Focus on what you can do as small acts of kindness to support others:

  • letting someone know you are thinking about them
  • cooking a meal for someone
  • sending a little motivational note or card
  • paying it forward for example buying a coffee/sandwich for someone
  • helping with someone’s shopping
  • thanking someone for helping you out
  • make a loved one breakfast or dinner
  • do or pay for someone’s shopping

Bring awareness to acts of kindness around you and notice how it makes you feel. You can elevate the feel-good factor, by making it bigger and brighter, feeling it flowing throughout your body, feel the warmth.

Watch some inspirational clips, films or videos, they can really uplevel the warm feeling and help us to shrug off any negative vibes.

Listen to motivational music, what do you notice makes you feel good, share it with others, they may like it too.

Make someone feel special today.

Meditate- there is a loving kindness meditation which is great to listen to each day.

Spend some time thinking about kindness, it has the same effects, start to visualise acts of kindness and the feelings that come with it, notice them, what are they like for you and how might you enhance them.

Research shows that giving, receiving or witnessing kindness improves our mental and physical health

So, it seems that there is a lot to like and if we all take action, the world will be a much happier place, boosting feelings of optimism, compassion, confidence and happiness.

The sense of connection and community when being kind is something special, it’s an opportunity to unite, to support, and encourage others. Kindness is about giving wholeheartedly, without any explanation or expectations of anything in return.

Treating ourselves kindly means that we are more likely to forgive ourselves as we learn through life, we are ever evolving and that’s ok. With forgiveness, comes the motivation to help us learn and avoid the same mistakes.

Let us know how you have spread the kindness factor; sharing is definitely caring on this one.

Go kindly x

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